Open Intellectual Property

thebroadcaster:

BitCoin – the world’s first decentralized, open-source digital currency.


via curiositycounts

“Members of the class of 2011 are facing an anemic job market as the national unemployment rate hovers around 9 percent. Here are some of the ways graduating seniors are getting a leg up:
-Applying at places they happen to walk by and get a good feeling about
-Getting the phone numbers of the 500 biggest companies in the United States; calling them and screaming, “ARE YOU HIRING?”
-Practicing handshake with boss doll at home
-Packaging resumé with a free iTunes download
-Lurking at Chinese lunch buffet to find out what people with jobs talk about
-Putting up “Josh Needs Work” fliers in their area and expecting support, not laughter, you guys
-Googling “How to get a job”
-Comping extra slice of cheese on sandwich of anyone who looks as if they might be hiring”

—   Job searches are abound… this might be a bit too true (via The Onion)
the-whole:

msnbc:

New York Times had to stop the presses - literally - when  the Osama news broke. This is what their homepage was going to be  before they received word of the president’s announcement.
Photo: Nick Bilton/Flickr via mediabistro

I kinda understand why the NYT had to stop the presses. It was not  the only paper. The Oklahoman also scrambled to get Osama’s death on the  front.
But I had a chat with a colleague and he posed this question:
What  good did it do - business wise - for newspapers, especially local ones,  to stop the presses? What extra value could local papers have added?

Good question.

the-whole:

msnbc:

New York Times had to stop the presses - literally - when the Osama news broke. This is what their homepage was going to be before they received word of the president’s announcement.

Photo: Nick Bilton/Flickr via mediabistro

I kinda understand why the NYT had to stop the presses. It was not the only paper. The Oklahoman also scrambled to get Osama’s death on the front.

But I had a chat with a colleague and he posed this question:

What good did it do - business wise - for newspapers, especially local ones, to stop the presses? What extra value could local papers have added?

Good question.

chenalexander:

Charting the Beatles.

Almost looks like guitar tabs…

chenalexander:

Charting the Beatles.

Almost looks like guitar tabs…

joshsternberg:

LEGO: Star Wars

May the 4th be with you.

(Source: joshsternberg)

jaketbrooks:

Another strong interactive over at the Times.
Things about it I love:
1) How quickly they were able to collect the information, build the interactive and launch it after the news broke.
2) It includes the names of the people who conceived of it and built it, Aron Pilhofer and Jon Huang.
3) Perfect example of how good things can come of creating an environment where journalists and developers can collaboratively innovate.
Beyond its creation, I’m incredibly interested in the business behind the interactives. What is their traffic like? Is the ad sales department given enough lead time to sell against them? Do they draw a higher CPM? I could see an entire micro-industry inside the Times popping up around them.
Think about it. A specialized ad sales person could create unique relationships with advertisers based on their desire to be placed adjacent to an interactive vs. an ordinary article. Not only do the numbers bear out—potentially higher traffic, longer time spent on the page, likelihood of it going viral is higher—but the quality of the thing is higher. It gives advertisers the opportunity to position their brands next to something that is truly unique and innovative, something that is different from anything they could find elsewhere.

jaketbrooks:

Another strong interactive over at the Times.

Things about it I love:

1) How quickly they were able to collect the information, build the interactive and launch it after the news broke.

2) It includes the names of the people who conceived of it and built it, Aron Pilhofer and Jon Huang.

3) Perfect example of how good things can come of creating an environment where journalists and developers can collaboratively innovate.

Beyond its creation, I’m incredibly interested in the business behind the interactives. What is their traffic like? Is the ad sales department given enough lead time to sell against them? Do they draw a higher CPM? I could see an entire micro-industry inside the Times popping up around them.

Think about it. A specialized ad sales person could create unique relationships with advertisers based on their desire to be placed adjacent to an interactive vs. an ordinary article. Not only do the numbers bear out—potentially higher traffic, longer time spent on the page, likelihood of it going viral is higher—but the quality of the thing is higher. It gives advertisers the opportunity to position their brands next to something that is truly unique and innovative, something that is different from anything they could find elsewhere.

(Source: jaketbrooks)

wnycradiolab:

Jell-o cubes bouncing at 6200 frames per second.  Forget everything you thought you knew about gelatin desserts.

(via the always-informative Metafilter)

(Source: youtube.com)

Butterfly in the sky…I can go twice as high

world-shaker:

This song is now

Stuck in your head

For the rest of the daaayyyy

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

rachelsterne:

GigaOm on NYC as a Platform

So does this make it an open source city?

rachelsterne:

GigaOm on NYC as a Platform

So does this make it an open source city?

(Source: nycdigital, via nycedc)